The macro-highway M-80

logicapsule 2

«Once the people begin to reason, all is lost» (Voltaire)

The day the president of Bonkia decided to participate in the construction of the M-80 high-altitude macro-highway, nobody knew the scope of the project – how devastating it would be both socially and economically. The plan was to build a motorway that would ease the traffic burden of the city, based on the macro-networks of Los Angeles. At least that’s what the media said time and again. They launched an awareness campaign to inform citizens, promising new jobs and better services for the city. It opened up a whole new universe of possibilities, like we saw with the Grand World Casino in Seville. For years, Spanish flags flew from cranes and rooftops announcing the M-80. Everyone had work. Legions of immigrants came to fill positions in construction: Africans, Haitians, South Africans, Russians… everyone had a place. Everyone had work. A wave of patriotism was amplified through the media, announcing the amazing success of the construction sector in Spain, in partnership with Chinese, Arab and Russian companies. Adverts featuring families with beautiful blond children and newly painted houses flooded the media. It was the Spanish dream, and they promoted it through adverts for new ring roads that would take you straight to suburban paradises brimming with thousands of semi-detached microresidences: clean air, gardens, and the key to a new life with a future full of possibilities. Too good to be true? Everyone wanted to believe it.

But when the blueprints of the full macro-project were leaked on the web, it didn’t take a genius to see that what they were really planning was to build a new city using the old one as the foundation. You didn’t have to be an architect to figure it out. They erected pillars and built new buildings atop them, and the people who made it possible with the sweat of their brow just shrugged their shoulders. There was work. There was a future. They thought the dream could still be achieved if one worked hard enough.

They inaugurated the first phase of the M-80. Little by little, politicians, millionaires, celebrities and the entire social elite began to move, followed by banks, multinationals, hospitals, universities, hypermarkets… Imagine the look on the face of the average Spaniard, from workmen to small investors, entrepreneurs, etc., when they announced that in the end they would not be building the second phase of the project for lack of investment. The upstairs society began to function like clockwork, and the society below began to slowly unravel. Social discontent led to a higher suicide rate, civil unrest, robbery and other crime. The future described by the Spanish dream began to fade in the minds of those who wanted to believe in it, and a very different reality set in. A reality designed by those who were living the high life up top, in Madrid-superior.

Access to the upper level was secured, leaving the lower level incommunicado. “The cesspool”, they called it. As the people in Madrid-superior began to occupy the new neighbourhoods, the cesspool began to break into sectors. The B-1 sector was home to brokers, tipsters, graders… the people that managed the geld of the rich to make them richer. B-2 sector housed the idiots who broke their backs daily repairing stretches of the M-80 so they could save for a trifling retirement, but not even making enough to put food on the table each day. And in sectors B-3, B-4 and B-5, the people no one wanted to see. The people who recycled the shit that filtered down from above to make just enough to survive on.

Nothing has ever been the same since the inauguration of the M-80. It’s like wadding up a blank sheet of paper, then smoothing it out and pretending not a single mark has been left. It will never go back to the way it was. But one thing is for sure: the sheet will still be blank, and there are many stories to be written on it.

<Zoro’s note> The disease-free world they invented for you is nothing more than the filth that forms the scab you need to pick to be free.

The day the president of Bonkia decided to participate in the construction of the M-80 high-altitude macro-highway, nobody knew the scope of the project – how devastating it would be both socially and economically. The plan was to build a motorway that would ease the traffic burden of the city, based on the macro-networks of Los Angeles.

At least that’s what the media said time and again. They launched an awareness campaign to inform citizens, promising new jobs and better services for the city. It opened up a whole new universe of possibilities, like we saw with the Grand World Casino in Seville. For years, Spanish flags flew from cranes and rooftops announcing the M-80.

Everyone had work. Legions of immigrants came to fill positions in construction: Africans, Haitians, South Africans, Russians… everyone had a place. Everyone had work. A wave of patriotism was amplified through the media, announcing the amazing success of the construction sector in Spain, in partnership with Chinese, Arab and Russian companies.

Adverts featuring families with beautiful blond children and newly painted houses flooded the media. It was the Spanish dream, and they promoted it through adverts for new ring roads that would take you straight to suburban paradises brimming with thousands of semi-detached microresidences: clean air, gardens, and the key to a new life with a future full of possibilities. Too good to be true? Everyone wanted to believe it.

But when the blueprints of the full macro-project were leaked on the web, it didn’t take a genius to see that what they were really planning was to build a new city using the old one as the foundation. You didn’t have to be an architect to figure it out.

They erected pillars and built new buildings atop them, and the people who made it possible with the sweat of their brow just shrugged their shoulders. There was work. There was a future. They thought the dream could still be achieved if one worked hard enough.

They inaugurated the first phase of the M-80. Little by little, politicians, millionaires, celebrities and the entire social elite began to move, followed by banks, multinationals, hospitals, universities, hypermarkets…

Imagine the look on the face of the average Spaniard, from workmen to small investors, entrepreneurs, etc., when they announced that in the end they would not be building the second phase of the project for lack of investment.

The upstairs society began to function like clockwork, and the society below began to slowly unravel. Social discontent led to a higher suicide rate, civil unrest, robbery and other crime.

The future described by the Spanish dream began to fade in the minds of those who wanted to believe in it, and a very different reality set in. A reality designed by those who were living the high life up top, in Madrid-superior.

Access to the upper level was secured, leaving the lower level incommunicado. “The cesspool”, they called it. As the people in Madrid-superior began to occupy the new neighbourhoods, the cesspool began to break into sectors.

The B-1 sector was home to brokers, tipsters, graders… the people that managed the geld of the rich to make them richer. B-2 sector housed the idiots who broke their backs daily repairing stretches of the M-80 so they could save for a trifling retirement, but not even making enough to put food on the table each day. And in sectors B-3, B-4 and B-5, the people no one wanted to see. The people who recycled the shit that filtered down from above to make just enough to survive on.

Nothing has ever been the same since the inauguration of the M-80. It’s like wadding up a blank sheet of paper, then smoothing it out and pretending not a single mark has been left. It will never go back to the way it was. But one thing is for sure: the sheet will still be blank, and there are many stories to be written on it.

<Zoro’s note> The disease-free world they invented for you is nothing more than the filth that forms the scab you need to pick to be free.

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